Home > about saint francis hospice > News > Dying Matters Week: How many of us are Dying To Be Heard?

Dying Matters Week: How many of us are Dying To Be Heard?

As a society, we plan birth really well. Every pregnant mother is asked to complete a birth plan, which includes questions around where they wish to give birth, who they'd like to be with them, and which pain relief they'd want — if any.

dmw

Something people don't tend to plan as well, however, is that taboo subject called 'death'. Here at Saint Francis Hospice, we know that planning end of life is equally as important as mapping the beginning of one.

 

Dying Matters Week was designed to break the stigma. The awareness week encourages people to talk about and listen to all things related to death and grief, and it starts today.

 

Planning a death may prompt decisions on resuscitation, potential treatment, social care, funeral wishes, where you wish to die, and who you'd like to be there with you on that day.

 

The national campaign aims to simplify the things many of us tend to put off, such as choosing a lasting power of attorney should you not have the capacity to make decisions yourself.

 

Dying Matters Week's strapline remains Let's Talk About It. It's too easy to dodge those conversations around death with a quip or a "maybe later." So, when someone wants to talk about death, we owe it to them to be the other half of that conversation. If they want to talk, then we need to listen.

 

2020's theme is Dying To Be Heard, which will focus on how you can help by listening. How many people want to talk about death, but feel they have no one to talk to? How many people are Dying To Be Heard?

 

The Dying Matters Week website contains tips on how to have those difficult conversations and will reassure you that you don't need to be an expert on wills, funerals, and power of attorneys to a make a difference.

 

We'll also be sharing stories throughout the week.

 

DMW

Archive